Chapter 12: Sound

Sound Waves

This page provides further discussion of the nature of sound waves.

http://www.physicsclassroom.com/Class/sound/u11l1a.cfm

(Objective: Explain how sound waves are produced.)

Follow these simple instructions to build a “tin can” telephone and learn how sound waves can travel along a string.

http://uw.physics.wisc.edu/~wonders/StringTelephone.html

http://uw.physics.wisc.edu/~wonders/StringTelephone.html

(Objective: Explain how sound waves are produced.)

Sound Videos

Tibetan singing bowls, used in meditation for centuries, provide an excellent visual and audio demonstration of waves.

http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/observations/2011/07/01/forget-diet-coke-and-mentos-singing-bowls-excite-droplet-fountains-video/

(Objective: Explain how sound waves are produced.)

This video shows a wine glass shattering when a sine wave is played at the same frequency as the glass’s resonant frequency. The real time demonstration is followed by a high speed video version.

http://techtv.mit.edu/videos/2964-breaking-glass-with-sound

(Objective: Relate frequency to pitch.)

A sound wave visualization applet.

http://illuminations.nctm.org/ActivityDetail.aspx?id=37

(Objective: Relate frequency to pitch.)

The Doppler Effect

The Doppler effect is also used to aid scientists in the search for exoplanets.

http://www.physics.org/article-questions.asp?id=57

(Objective: Recognize the Doppler effect, and determine the direction of a frequency shift when there is relative motion between a source and an observer.)

A further discussion of the Doppler effect and shock waves.

http://www.physicsclassroom.com/Class/sound/u11l3b.cfm

(Objective: Recognize the Doppler effect, and determine the direction of a frequency shift when there is relative motion between a source and an observer.)

A brief biography of Christian Doppler.

http://www-history.mcs.st-and.ac.uk/history//Biographies/Doppler.html

http://www-history.mcs.st-and.ac.uk/history//Biographies/Doppler.html

(Objective: Recognize the Doppler effect, and determine the direction of a frequency shift when there is relative motion between a source and an observer.)

Sound Intensity and Resonance

A sound level intensity mini lesson with follow-up questions and answers.

http://dev.physicslab.org/Document.aspx?doctype=3&filename=WavesSound_SoundLevelIntensity.xml

(Objective: Calculate the intensity of sound waves.)

Harmonics

A cellist talks about vibrations and the physics of sound in this video clip.

http://www.pbs.org/wnet/musicinstinct/video/physics-of-sound/cellist-michael-fitzpatrick-on-vibrations/37/

(Objective: Calculate the harmonics of a vibrating string and of open and closed pipes.)

Further discussion of resonance and standing waves.

http://www.physicsclassroom.com/Class/sound/u11l4a.cfm

(Objective: Calculate the harmonics of a vibrating string and of open and closed pipes.)

This Science of Music website provides a wide range of videos and activities for students interested in exploring the topic further.

http://www.exploratorium.edu/music/index.html

http://www.exploratorium.edu/music/index.html

(Objective: Relate the frequency difference between two waves to the number of beats heard per second.)

Use household items to make your very own pan pipe. Entertain your friends and family for hours on end!

http://www.msichicago.org/online-science/activities/activity-detail/activities/make-music-with-straws/

http://www.msichicago.org/online-science/activities/activity-detail/activities/make-music-with-straws/

(Objective: Calculate the harmonics of a vibrating string and of open and closed pipes.)