Chapter 2: Motion in One Dimension

Displacement, Velocity, and Acceleration

This simulation allows the student to move a figure back and forth along a line and control his position, velocity, and acceleration. Students use graphs to plot the motion of the figure.

http://phet.colorado.edu/en/simulation/moving-man

(Objective: Describe motion in terms of frame of reference, displacement, time, and velocity.)

A clickable graphic showing an overview of the concept of motion with links to further information, interactive problems, and graphs.

http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/mot.html#motcon

http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/mot.html#motcon

(Objective: Describe motion in terms of frame of reference, displacement, time, and velocity.)

A simple, clear video demonstration of constant displacement, velocity, and acceleration. Also includes graphs of the motion.

http://www.regentsprep.org/regents/physics/phys01/constmot/default.htm

(Objective: Compare graphical representations of accelerated and nonaccelerated motions.)

Free Fall

In this video, science writer Dan Falk narrates Steve Shore’s recreation of Galileo’s falling bodies experiment at Pisa. The video also includes a short background on Galileo and the concepts involved.

 http://www.symmetrymagazine.org/breaking/2009/10/17/galileos-falling-bodies-experiment-re-created-at-pisa/

(Objective: Relate the motion of a freely falling body to motion with constant acceleration.)

This easy experiment using a cup of water offers a chance to see free fall in action.

http://www.learner.org/interactives/parkphysics/freefall2.html

http://www.learner.org/interactives/parkphysics/freefall2.html

(Objective: Relate the motion of a freely falling body to motion with constant acceleration.)

An animation showing the difference between free fall and terminal velocity.

http://www.csun.edu/scied/4-discrpeant-event/how_fast_do_things_fall/animations.htm

(Objective: Relate the motion of a freely falling body to motion with constant acceleration.)