Chapter 13: Ions in Aqueous Solutions and Colligative Properties

Compounds in Solutions
Precipitation Reactions – interactive tutorial on ionic compounds, solubility, and precipitates.

http://www.wisc-online.com/Objects/ViewObject.aspx?ID=GCH2904

(Main Idea: Ions separate from each other when ionic compounds are dissolved in water.)

Strong and Weak Electrolytes – video demonstration of the conductive properties of strong and weak electrolytes.

http://www.kentchemistry.com/aplinks/chapters/4chemrxns/2SWElectrolytes.htm

(Main Idea: An electrolyte’s strength depends on how many dissolved ions it contains.)

Electrolysis

Electrolysis – Faraday’s laws of electrolysis.

http://www.sepuplhs.org/high/hydrogen/electrolysis_sim.html

(Main Idea: An electrolyte’s strength depends on how many dissolved ions it contains.)

Colligative Properties

Colligative Properties – explanation of colligative properties and osmotic pressure.

http://chemed.chem.purdue.edu/genchem/topicreview/bp/ch15/colligative.php

(Main Idea: Lowering vapor pressure depends on nonelectrolyte solute concentration.)

Colligative Properties – video explanation of colligative properties, those that depend on the molality of the solution, including freezing point depression, boiling point elevation, and more.

http://www.brightstorm.com/science/chemistry/chemical-solutions/colligative-properties/

(Main Idea: A solution with a nonelectrolyte solute will have a lower freezing point than the pure solvent; A solution with a nonelectrolyte solute will have a higher boiling point than the pure solvent.)

Boiling-Point Elevation and Freezing-Point Depression – interactive experiment; you pick the solvent and solute and control the temperature, and observe the boiling point or freezing point of your solution.

http://group.chem.iastate.edu/Greenbowe/sections/projectfolder/flashfiles/propOfSoln/colligative.html

(Main Idea: A solution with a nonelectrolyte solute will have a lower freezing point than the pure solvent; A solution with a nonelectrolyte solute will have a higher boiling point than the pure solvent.)